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The Best Low Input Lag TVs for Gaming in 2017

This article has been updated to reflect current 2017 models

It’s no surprise to see that 4K resolution coupled with HDR (high dynamic range) has taken the tech industry by storm. Even though these new TVs have been on the market for a couple of years now, it’s not until this year where we are seeing huge improvements in the top end of the spectrum. LG notoriously received a lot of backlash for introducing a lot of input lag in their 2016 OLED TVs, which was later patched after significant criticism. To my surprise, LG has taken input lag very seriously in their 2017 models, and has become the champion of low input lag TVs across their entire 2017 model range! So, which TV should you get? Keep reading to find out.

 

Top Pick:

LG B7A 4K HDR OLED TV

Input Lag: 21ms – Great

This TV not only wins our top pick award for 2017, but is a very personal choice for me as well. I purchased LG’s 65-inch OLED65B7A OLED earlier this year, as I’ve been wanting to upgrade to an OLED for quite a while now. For those unaware, OLED is a display technology that offers significant benefits over traditional LCD displays, namely with it’s perfect black level and wider color gamut. LED TVs have to illuminate the entire screen in order to display an image on the screen, even areas that are supposed to be pure black, such as the black bars in movies. This causes the black level to raise, reducing your contrast ratio and the amount of “pop” your image has. OLED TVs can independently control each pixel on its panel, gaining the ability to turn off a pixel to achieve pure black. If you have a recent Samsung smartphone or the new iPhone X, you’ve already seen the great benefits of OLED tech. LCD TVs typically also have worse motion performance when compared to OLED.

Even with these advancements, I didn’t jump on the OLED train right away, as its input lag was still too high for my needs, When I first started testing OLED TVs in 2015, their input lag was absymal. LG’s first generation OLEDs clocked around 60ms of input lag, and the B6/C6 models last year also had high input lag, however this was later reduced in a patch, down to 28ms. This year, LG has reduced input lag even further in their 7 series OLED models, all the way down to 21ms in game mode. This includes HDR mode as well, meaning you can have low input lag across both game modes! Jumping from a LCD to a OLED TV without any HDR enabled is already a significant leap, but coupling OLED with 4K HDR is truly a sight to behold. Since the release of the Xbox One X, I’ve been glued to my 65-inch B7A, testing a range of 4K HDR enhanced games such as Gears of War 4, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Forza Motorsport 7, and even older games that received enhancements, such as Gears of War 3 and Mirror’s Edge. All of them were simply stunning, and the low input lag on the B7A really helped immerse me into the experience. I also tested this TV with a range of fighting games such as Street Fighter V and Tekken 7, both of which I compete in. There is about a 1 frame difference coming from a fast gaming monitor, but the difference in overall experience is night and day, and most gamers won’t notice the difference.

For me, I was happy to compromise with slightly higher lag in exchange for an OLED display with true 10-bit HDR10 and Dolby Vision support. This TV includes 4 HDMI 2.0 ports, 5Ghz Wi-Fi, as well as full 4:4:4 chroma subsampling once you set your input to PC mode. It features a native 120hz panel, and can also accept a 1080p/120hz input from a gaming PC, allowing you to experience even lower input lag! LG’s B7A models use the same panel as their higher end sets such as the C7 and W7, so the B7A is an absolute bang for buck. The B7A is offered in both 55-inch and 65-inch screen sizes, and all features, including its input lag, are identical between both models. It’s no surprise that the B7A is my favorite TV this year. The 55-inch model retails for $2,299, however Amazon is doing a really big sale on both sizes for Black Friday.

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Fastest TV:

LG UJ7700 4K HDR TV

Input Lag: 12ms – Excellent

LG’s 2017 OLEDs aren’t the only knockout TVs this year. The UJ7700 series is the first LG TV I tested earlier this year, and I was extremely surprised by the result, as no other TV came close to its performance. While the majority of TV manufacturers are doing everything they can to push the most nits and wide color gamut for HDR content, the UJ7700 comes in a modest package and affordable price point. The UJ7700 supports the latest HDR formats, including HDR10, Dolby Vision, and HLG, just like LG’s other sets. It comes with 4 HDMI 2.0 ports, and features a 60hz panel, instead of the 120hz panels found in higher end TVs. Where this TV shines is its gaming performance, as it offers an ultra-low 12ms input lag when set to game mode! This was previously unheard of in all of my previous tests, as no TVs were able to match the speedy performance of a 60hz gaming monitor. If input lag is the #1 thing you look for in a TV, then you can’t go wrong with the UJ7700. LG’s UJ7700 comes darn close, and still manages to output this low input lag while in HDR mode. I tested both the 55-inch 55UJ7700  and 65-inch 65UJ7700 models, and found them to have the same input lag. This TV is also offered in other sizes. and it’s priced very attractively. The 55-inch model comes with a MSRP of $899, however Amazon is currently selling this TV well under that price.

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Best Value:

Samsung MU6300 4K HDR TV

Input Lag: 20ms – Excellent

Samsung has been a leader with input lag over the past year, starting with their 2016 models. This trend continues into 2017, as all of Samsung’s 2017 TVs offer very low input lag, as featured in our input lag database. One of our standout picks for the best value is their MU6300 series. Similar to the UJ7700 series above, the MU6300 is a competing model with a 60hz refresh rate, as well as HDR10 support. It sports a traditional LED backlight and comes with 3 HDMI ports, which should be sufficient in hooking up all of your external sources. While the input lag doesn’t reach quite as low as the UJ7700, the MU6300 offers better picture quality overall, with much better dark room performance, including contrast ratio and lower black levels. I tested the 55-inch UN55MU6300 to clock in at 20ms of input lag, even across HDR picture modes. It’s a very strong performer, and comfortably holds its own against every other gaming TV this year. It also comes in a variety of sizes to meet any budget, making it a great value for most gamers. The 55-inch model comes with a MSRP of $899, however it can be found much cheaper on Amazon right now.

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That wraps up our best gaming TVs for 2017! Weren’t a fan of these TVs? That’s fine! Head on over to our input lag database and compare these to over 500 other displays tested for input lag!

About the author

Adeel Soomro

Adeel Soomro

Adeel Soomro, also known as “Four Wude”, has been a competitive Street Fighter 4 player since 2008. Using his extensive gaming experience on a casual and professional level, he aims to spread the awareness of input lag existing in today’s displays. Having tested over 300 displays for input lag, he hopes that DisplayLag will aid gamers around the world when purchasing the best HDTV or monitor for gaming.

48 Comments

  • I’ve come to an stale mate on weather or not to get the samsung ks8500 55 or the LG B6 55, I do play a lot of FPS shooters like COD, Battlefield etc..so reaction time

    is very important, I’ve noticed there is 9ms input lag difference between these 2, but the LG has a faster response time. My question is which is more important

    for a gamer and all things considered because of course I would like a nice picture as well what should I do??? Thanks in advance!!!

    • Hi Adam,

      If timing is everything to you, then get the Samsung. Prior to LG’s firmware update to the B6, it was quite different in terms of timing. Now, it’s a lot more close to call. OLED TVs do have a better response time for fast moving action, which will result in less motion blur, so the B6 may be the better overall buy for you in that regard. If I had to choose, I would pick the B6 with the latest firmware update. The picture quality benefit from OLED is extremely significant!

    • Totally late on this, but if you’re not impatient, you may want to look into the 2017 OLED models since they supposedly have input lag of only 22ms.

          • Apologies for the late reply. We are planning to test the new models very soon. Will post updates on social media and the website once we have the testing completed.

          • No problem Adeel. I forgot to mention that I really enjoyed your article. I’ll wait until you finish testing the Sony XBR-65X930E/LG B7, before I buy a new TV this year. Or, just wait until next year when HDMI 2.1 comes out. Do you think it will be possible to upgrade TVs next year to HDMI 2.1 through a firmware update?

          • I’m honestly not sure yet on how the HDMI 2.1 process works. I’d assume that it would be an entirely new port that will require a chain of devices to support its new features.

  • It may be wise for DisplayLag to also test for 4:4:4 chroma – I know that the B6 OLED and several Samsung TVs only achieve their lowest input lag with 4:2:2 or 4:2:0 chroma.

    Even if one believes that the difference between 4:4:4 and 4:2:0 is minimal, it’s still definitely something that should at least be noted. I find that the easiest way to test is to simply open the madVR chroma test pattern in MSpaint (which applies no scaling by default) while the TV is set to have no overscan: https://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?p=1640299#post1640299

  • You should also mention the Sony KDLW630/610 B/B2, it is still available at many places like Walmart and Best Buy, it’s 1080p only. But the lag in game mode (~24 ms) is great.

  • Great article guys! I just purchased an LG B6 the other day but haven’t picked it up yet from Best Buy. Being a somewhat competitive gamer, I wanted to make sure the input/display lag was sufficient. After everything I saw online prior to reading this article, I was almost convinced I would have to go with a different TV. But if the update really does reduce the lag to 28 ms, I’m cool with that. Thanks for helping me with that decision!

      • No I haven’t even picked it up yet. I’m waiting till I move in March. I can’t wait! BTW, a few questions have come up from my online research. I’ve been reading that people have been experiencing judder while playing games on OLED’s. Have you guys had similar experiences? Do the Samsung’s also have this issue? And if so, does it really affect gameplay at all? Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks!

  • Is there a reason the LG OLED65B6P (the 65in version) would have different display lag from the 55in version? I was looking at the 55in LG OLED55B6P, but I am also considering the 65in version.

  • What about 1080p displays? 4k displays are expensive overkill for gaming, since games are mostly played at 1080p or 1440p (which is not available for TVs).

    • Most of the newer models come in 4K only. 1080p displays are fine, but most manufacturers are phasing them out in favor of 4K. Have you checked our input lag database? We have a large selection of 1080p displays tested.

  • I appreciate your article, what do you think of the LG OLED55C6p ? it is curved display and has 3D abilities for the same price as a 55b6p you reviewed. More for the money?

    • Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten my hands on the C6 series, so I can’t be too specific about it. Based on preliminary research, it should be quite close to the B6P if you really want to go with a curved display.

      • I am uncommitted on flat vs curved, but I was thinking more of the “C” has passive 3D for the same price as the “B” . For some reason, and I don”t have the slightest clue as to why, but the “B” weights 6.6 lbs more than the “C”. Do you think the passive 3D might take away some from the picture quality when using in 2D. I am buying this mainly for xbox Scorpio use by the way. Your opinion is greatly valued , and thanks.

        • Forgive me, I now realize passive 3D doesnt make anything 3d , you have to have 3D programming which there isn’t any basically. So If I have this correct, Oled, flat screen is best for gaming. You said “I would pick the B6 with the latest firmware update.” how do I know which firmware a tv has or can it update itself over the internet? ( 2016 tv’s so much cheaper than 2017)

  • The MAJOR problem with the Samsung TVs is that if you use Game Mode (needed to get these low latency numbers), you WILL get screen glitches (red, blue, or green vertical lines) that flash on the screen randomly, every few seconds. This issue is related to the “One Connect” box that Samsung has been using, and this has been a known issue for at least 2 years. Some users are noticing the issue right away, and some users are noticing the issue after using the TV for around 1 month (myself included). Samsung has not been able to fix it, and users have tried to have their TVs repaired to no avail.

    I used to be Samsung fan, but I’d recommend avoiding Samsung TVs if you plan on doing any gaming. FYI, the issue is the worst on the most recent “KS” (2016) model TVs that are featured in this article.

    It’s been reported on AVForums, PS4 Forums, Reddit, TomsGuide, nVidia Forums, and other sites. Just search for “Samsung one connect box blue lines” or something like that.

  • i have a lg uh6100 and i play CS and you dont note the 33ms i think this result are not testes with chroma 4:4:4 cuz it feels even faster with it

  • I checked my tv and it shows 25ms. Does that mean that it was tested with game mode on? What will be the ms if it’s not game mode. If I get a monitor with has 1ms, will I notice an improvement?

    • It is actually 35ms when in checked here. My tv is Samsung UN55EH6000. The values here are under game mode? And will I notice an improvement in games like FIFA if I get a benq monitor which 1ms?
      Thanks

  • I was wondering what is the best monitor to use if I want play games with older systems like the Playstation 2?

  • I’m buying a 85 inch TV for gaming in September! Please review and I’ll use your link or tell me which one I should buy. I was looking at these three.
    Samsung UN85JU7100 85-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2015 Model),
    Sony XBR85X850D 85-Inch 4K HDR Ultra HD Smart TV (2016 model),
    Samsung Electronics UN78JS8600 78-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV
    Thanks Brae Hulery

  • I’m torn right now on what to buy for a TV I mainly looking at the OLED65C7P. I planning on getting the Xbox One X so response time is a big one for me when deciding. I play on a 1080p monitor 1ms response time and here are my questions.

    1. I’m wondering how my experience will be impacted going from 1ms to 21ms? I play a lot of shooters but also slow games like skyrim.
    2. Will the 120hz help at all for response time or missing frames?
    3. Any differences in response time between the 55 and 65 inch models?
    4. Should I hold out for the 2018 model for possible lower response times or it’s not worth time for such a small decrease.

    Sorry for all the questions I just needed to ask someone.

  • Have you tried any once the Larger TVs, 70 to 82 inch tvs are now avalliable from makers like Samsung. The Samsung 82 inch isn’t qled, I’m just looking for something that will look good playing battlefront 2 or fallout, and to watch movies on in my man cave.

  • Hi,
    I’m considering the Sony A1 oled or the Panasonic ez952 OLED TVs. Each has its pros and cons. The input lag on the Sony for 4k gaming in game mode is 28 ms. But for 1080p gaming is 50ms. I’ll be mostly gaming in 1080p.
    The Panasonic lag is 25 ms in both 1080p and 4K in game mode. I’m a casual gamer with only a little online playing. Will I notice the difference? What would you recommend ?

  • I’m actually more interested in some good budget friendly UHD TVS. Those are so out of my budget range it doesn’t even matter which is best :oP

    And that is some extremly large TVS. I don’t have the space for that xD

  • While 20 is a low input lag on a television, it’s still far from good enough :/
    I own a gaming monitor (144hz 1-3ms input lag) and a 4K television with about 21 ms input lag. For competitive fps shooters I’d claim the 21ms tv to be completely useless.
    It’s great fun for games like X-com 2 where speedy actions and twitch reaction is non existent, but it’s weird that tv’s are still so far from the monitors when it comes to speed. I hope single digit input lag and 120+ native refresh rate (also on input) will be the norm of 2018 with the new HDMI standard arriving, and new sets hopefully aim to close the input-lag gap to Monitors, because 1 vs 21 ms is a 2100% difference and is really a party-breaker when gaming on a TV.

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